Paper – FTIR microscopy with RMieS

FTIR microscopy of biological cells and tissue: data analysis using resonant Mie scattering (RMieS) EMSC algorithm
Paul Bassan, Ashwin Sachdeva, Achim Kohler, Caryn Hughes, Alex Henderson, Jonathan Boyle, Jonathan H. Shanks, Michael Brown, Noel W. Clarke and Peter Gardner
Analyst 137 (2012) 1370-1377

Abstract

Transmission and transflection infrared microscopy of biological cells and tissue suffer from significant baseline distortions due to scattering effects, predominantly resonant Mie scattering (RMieS). This scattering can also distort peak shapes and apparent peak positions making interpretation difficult and often unreliable. A correction algorithm, the resonant Mie scattering extended multiplicative signal correction (RMieS-EMSC), has been developed that can be used to remove these distortions. Continue reading

Paper – Exceptional preservation of a prehistoric human brain from Heslington, Yorkshire, UK

Exceptional preservation of a prehistoric human brain from Heslington,
Yorkshire, UK

Sonia O’Connor, Esam Ali, Salim Al-Sabah, Danish Anwar, Ed Bergström, Keri A. Brown, Jo Buckberry, Stephen Buckley, Matthew Collins, John Denton, Konrad M. Dorling, Adam Dowle, Phil Duffey, Howell G.M. Edwards, Elsa Correia Faria, Peter Gardner, Andy Gled
Journal of Archaeological Science 38 (2011) 1641-1654

Abstract

Archaeological work in advance of construction at a site on the edge of York, UK, yielded human remains of prehistoric to Romano-British date. Amongst these was a mandible and cranium, the intra-cranial space of which contained shrunken but macroscopically recognizable remains of a brain. Although the distinctive surface morphology of the organ is preserved, little recognizable brain histology survives. Though rare, the survival of brain tissue in otherwise skeletalised human remains from wet burial environments is not unique. A survey of the literature shows that similar brain masses have been previously reported in diverse circumstances. We argue for a greater awareness of these brain masses and for more attention to be paid to their detection and identification in order to improve the reporting rate and to allow a more comprehensive study of this rare archaeological survival.

Review – Raman tweezers and their application to the study of singly trapped eukaryotic cells

Raman tweezers and their application to the study of singly trapped eukaryotic cells
Richard D. Snook, Timothy J. Harvey, Elsa Correia Faria and Peter Gardner
Integrative Biology 1 (2009) 43-52

Abstract

In this review the recent emergence of Raman tweezers as an analytical technique for single eukaryotic cell analysis is described. The Raman tweezer technique combines Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool with optical tweezers by which means single cells can be trapped and manipulated in a laser beam using a high numerical aperture imaging microscope. Necessary instrumental requirements to facilitate Raman tweezer experiments are discussed together with practical considerations such as the potential for photodamage of cells subjected to trapping and Raman excitation. Specific applications of Raman tweezers to the analysis of cancer cells, erythrocytes and lymphocytes, micro-organisms and sub-cellular components e.g.chromosomes and mitochondria are then discussed followed by a summary of the future potential of the technique for single cell analysis.

Graphical abstract